The secret profession

With a fast-growing membership around the world, the RICS surveying qualification could be considered one of the UK’s most successful education exports. Ten years ago, just 15% of members and candidates were based outside the UK – today, more than a third can be found across Asia, Europe, the Middle East, India and the Americas. But what isn’t changing nearly fast enough is the gender balance of the RICS. Globally, only 16% of members are female and the figure is even lower in the UK, leaving the profession hardly representative of its client base or the populations it serves. In this article for Modus, the RICS magazine, I reported on the institution’s drive to recruit from a broader cross-section of society, making careers in surveying more appealing to school kids and graduates alike – and, crucially, making them aware that surveying exists in the first place.

 

Author: Katie Puckett

I'm a journalist who has been writing, editing and subbing business magazines for nearly 20 years. I write regularly on all aspects of the built environment – architecture, engineering, construction, property, investment, housing, planning, economics, sustainability, climate change adaptation, technology, insurance – and I’m always up for getting to grips with new topics. I’m also co-founder of Wordmule, a company that creates bespoke editorial and marketing content about buildings and cities.