What if the press got hold of it?

Managing conflicts of interest is a fundamental ethical challenge for the surveying profession, and one that arises on a daily basis at firms large and small, as I found out for this business advice piece for Modus magazine. Impartiality has never been more important, or more under scrutiny: the internet and a relentless 24-hour news cycle have made public life increasingly transparent, while a long list of scandals, from the collapse of Enron to MPs’ expenses and LIBOR rigging, have severely dented confidence in traditional institutions. In response, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors is undertaking a major review of its guidelines – conflicts of interest account for a very small number of complaints against RICS members but it expects this to increase as awareness grows. I interviewed its head of regulation about how members can protect themselves, why client consent is not enough, and applying the “Daily Mail test” to every decision.

Author: Katie Puckett

I'm a journalist who has been writing, editing and subbing business magazines for nearly 20 years. I write regularly on all aspects of the built environment – architecture, engineering, construction, property, investment, housing, planning, economics, sustainability, climate change adaptation, technology, insurance – and I’m always up for getting to grips with new topics. I’m also co-founder of Wordmule, a company that creates bespoke editorial and marketing content about buildings and cities.