A dignified end

“Would I be surprised if this person were to die at some stage in the near future?” That’s probably not a question many of those working with homeless people will feel comfortable asking themselves. But according to a new NHS guide to end-of-life care in hostels, it’s something they should bear in mind if they’re going to fulfil their clients’ last wishes and offer them a dignified death. It may be the only certainty, but death remains a difficult subject for both hostel residents and workers. In this article for Inside Housing, I spoke to the guide’s authors about starting difficult conversations, coping with serial bereavement and resisting the urge to force a “Cilla” moment.

Author: Katie Puckett

I'm a journalist who has been writing, editing and subbing business magazines for nearly 20 years. I write regularly on all aspects of the built environment – architecture, engineering, construction, property, investment, housing, planning, economics, sustainability, climate change adaptation, technology, insurance – and I’m always up for getting to grips with new topics. I’m also co-founder of Wordmule, a company that creates bespoke editorial and marketing content about buildings and cities.

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