This is Concrete magazine – Secrets of a long life

My company Wordmule has just produced a second issue of This is Concrete, the bespoke 24-page magazine we created for The Concrete Centre last year to tie in with their activities at the Ecobuild exhibition. Their themes were pretty diverse this year, from how to design buildings to last in a changing climate and create high-performance housing for people of all ages, to the thorny issue of accurately calculating the embodied carbon of building products. So we pulled it all together under a “sustainability for life” theme, with a special cover illustration by our very talented designer Nick Watts. Details of The Concrete Centre’s activities at Ecobuild were contained in a pull-out section, to extend the magazine’s shelf life beyond the event itself. Which fits in quite neatly with the theme, come to think of it.

This is Concrete Spring 2016

Cruel to be kind

When can you make a sensitive addition to a much-loved streetscape, and a striking brutalist statement at the same time? Why, when you’re expanding one of the UK’s legendary modernist campuses of course. That was the dream commission that Patel Taylor had at the University of Essex, profiled in the latest issue of Concrete Quarterly, which my company Wordmule produces for The Concrete Centre. Also featured: a Tokyo music school that has been named the best new education building in the world, a completely white concrete atrium connecting two neoclassical mansions at an art museum in Avignon, and Antarctic research station architect Hugh Broughton tells us about his favourite buildings.

CQ 255 Spring 2016

Small number, big problem

Even if – a very big if – global warming is held to the 1.5°C limit set by nearly 200 world leaders at the UN climate talks in Paris, this will represent a radical change in the global climate. The other big news from the Paris conference was an unprecedented emphasis on adapting to the change that is already happening, and which will continue for centuries to come, no matter what. Humankind faces an uncertain future in which extreme weather events are more frequent and more intense, and there is an escalating threat from storms, hail, flooding, droughts, tropical cyclones and landslides.

The Paris talks stopped short of setting targets or funding mechanisms, but the World Bank estimates that to adapt to a 2°C rise we would have to spend US$70-100bn each year between 2010 and 2050. The cost of not doing anything is pretty high too: over the last decade, annual damages to global real estate and infrastructure from severe weather events have tripled to US$150bn, reaching 8% of GDP in the worst hit regions, not including indirect losses to sectors such as tourism.

In this article for the RICS magazine, Modus, I investigated the far-reaching implications for property, from protecting individual homeowners against heatwaves and flooding, to future-proofing real-estate funds worth billions of dollars.

Modus_March 2016_pp26-27

And for much, much more detail on climate change adaptation, there’s this book I co-wrote for RIBA Publishing.